Open fire of Tandyr.
Open doors of History.

Traditions

BAIGE

BAIGE

BAIGE (horse race). Baige was the favorite spectacle among Kazakhs. The first baige was held when a child was bom; the last one was to celebrate the deceased’s memory. If baige was arranged at a funeral, part of the distance ran not far from the grave so that the deceased could hear hoof beats.

AYTIS

AYTIS

AYTIS (versification contest). One of the unique Kazakh traditions, aytis – song and poetry contest – was held during funeral feasts, weddings, and other important festivities. Aytis is a contest between two akyns in the art of spontaneous improvisation.

ASIRAP-ALU

ASIRAP ALU

ASIRAP ALU (adoption). Kazakhs have the following saying: “A house with children is like a market; a house without children is like a cemetery.” In fact, there is nothing sadder when a family does not have a child for many years.

KILEM-BASTAU

KILEM BASTAU, KILEM TOKU

KILEM BASTAU, KILEM TOKU (weaving of a carpet). Making of the carpet was very labor-intensive work, as indicated by the saying “To weave a carpet is just the same as to dig a well with a needle.’’The carpet was woven by four girls during a month, working from morning to night.

MUSHEL-KAYYRU

MUSHEL KAYYRU

MUSHEL KAYYRU (chronology of the Kazakhs). Kazakhs determined chronology and their own age according to the 12-year calendar of the nomads of Central Asia, which later became known to the world as the oriental calendar.

ULISTIN-ULI-KUNI---NAURYZ

ULISTIN ULI KUNI – NAURYZ

ULISTIN ULI KUNI – NAURYZ (the New Year). The major holiday among Kazaks has been Nauryz, the New Year, which is currently celebrated on March 22, the day of vernal equinox. People put their homes and households in order.

TOIBASTAR

TOIBASTAR

TOIBASTAR (wedding in the groom’s home). On the next day after betashar, the groom’s parents made a grand wedding party. Notified about the festivity beforehand, everybody gathered for celebration. This party was not particularly different from the bride’s seeing-off party.

BETASHAR

BETASHAR

BETASHAR (uncovering the bride’s face). Having heard about newlyweds’ arrival, the guests and villagers began to gather to betashar – the ceremonial uncovering the bride’s face – at the groom’s parents’ house. After all necessary preparations, the bride in saukele, supported on both sides by two young women, was led to the ceremonial place

SUIYINSHI

SUIYINSHI!

SUIYINSHI! (gift for the good news). The bride was leaving her aul followed by her mother. When the wedding caravan was approaching the groom’s village somebody from among his friends went forward to inform people about their arrival.

KALYNDYK-UZATU

KALYNDYK UZATU

KALYNDYK UZATU (departure of the bride to the groom’s village). Seeing off the bride started from the setting off the caravan consisting of several camels loaded with the bride’s dowry. The bride and her friends went to visit relatives and received blessings and gifts before she departed for the groom’s village.